Tips for Adjusting to Life With Dentures

If you just started wearing dentures, then you aren’t alone. Each year, about 15% of the population has dentures made. However, adjusting to dentures can prove to be a difficult task. It’s completely normal if you’re having trouble getting acclimated to your dentures. 

At Downtown Dental Studio, located in the Financial District of New York City, we’re here to help you cover all of your dental needs, including helping you with your dentures. And that’s why we’ve compiled this helpful guide for getting used to life with dentures. 

Eat soft foods

You’ll especially want to eat soft foods during the first few weeks. Softer foods are easier on your gums and teeth, and those foods are more comfortable to chew with your new dentures. You’ll also want to keep wearing your dentures, especially while you’re eating, since this will help you become accustomed to life with your new dentures.

Use an over-the-counter cream for tooth-pain

Adjusting to dentures as you start  wearing them can be quite uncomfortable and even painful. You may find that an over-the-counter pain reliever for tooth pain, like Orajel™, can be a helpful remedy for relieving your pain. 

Keep your dentures clean

 Much like your teeth, your dentures are also prone to staining from foods and drinks like:

It’s important to keep your dentures clean. Clean them by brushing, after every meal. When brushing, use a soft-bristled toothbrush, and clean your denture teeth in circular motions. Be sure to clean the parts between each tooth on your dentures and your gums as well. 

Take your dentures off before bed each night, and soak them in a denture solution only. Other products have ingredients that can damage or wear down your dentures, so be sure to only use specially formulated denture solutions. 

Use a denture adhesive

By the second or third week of wearing your dentures, you can start using a denture adhesive. A dental adhesive helps to keep your teeth in place so that they don’t move and can fit more comfortably on your gums.

A dental adhesive can also help improve your confidence when you’re eating. It is also at this point that you can switch to solid and harder foods. Introduce foods in smaller chunks, and chew those bites longer than you normally would.

For more information on dentures, schedule an appointment with one of our dentists at Downtown Dental Studio by calling our office or booking online.

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